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Climate change

A warming climate and the increasing loss of biodiversity are inextricably linked issues. Fauna & Flora and our global partners are protecting and restoring nature to reverse the impacts of climate change, for all life on Earth.

Our Changing Planet

Climate change is one of the biggest threats to our natural world and its biodiversity, as well as to global security, human health and well-being. The emission of greenhouse gases into the Earth’s atmosphere is a direct result of human activities, which include burning fossil fuels for energy, transport and many other purposes. At the same time, ecosystems such as forests and peatlands, which naturally store carbon and prevent its release into the atmosphere, are being destroyed – weakening nature’s ability to help maintain a stable climate.   

Tackling climate change together 

At Fauna & Flora, we look at climate change and biodiversity loss hand-in-hand. We’re focused on protecting and restoring irreplaceable carbon and biodiversity-rich ecosystems worldwide, from peatlands and wetlands to rainforests and marine protected areas. Across our projects on land, an estimated one billion tonnes of carbon is locked up in the environments we protect.   

We also build the resilience of those most affected by climate change, enabling them to adapt to a changing climate. From farmers in Nicaragua to community fishers in Turkey, we work with our partners to safeguard the livelihoods of the people on the front lines of climate change.

World Ocean Day litter picking (beach clean) and mangrove planting on Koh Rong, Cambodia. © Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora

World Ocean Day litter picking (beach clean) and mangrove planting on Koh Rong, Cambodia. © Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora

33 tonnes

The amount of carbon a great whale can sequester in its body

16 out of 17

The number of the warmest years ever recorded that have occurred since 2001.

    33 tonnes

    The amount of carbon a great whale can sequester in its body

    16 out of 17

    The number of the warmest years ever recorded that have occurred since 2001.

Preventing emissions

Recognising that climate change is one of the most serious threats to our planet and human welfare, many countries have now signed up to international climate change agreements that commit them to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The challenge now is for the international community to create the systems, policies and culture needed to meet these targets – and quickly.

Fauna & Flora, meanwhile, is playing its part in tackling this challenge in three key ways:

  • Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) – Deforestation has major implications for climate change, in part because it is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions in itself, but also because it destroys an important natural carbon store capable of absorbing some of our rising emissions. REDD+ presents an exciting opportunity to address this issue, which is why Fauna & Flora is working with governments around the world to trial this approach. When properly established, REDD+ will provide monetary incentives (through ‘carbon credits’) for communities to keep their forests standing. Not only does this protect vital carbon stores, it can also help to protect the biodiversity found in these forests. Learn more.
  • Protecting habitats – Although forests are perhaps the most recognised for their role in regulating atmospheric gases (and therefore climate), almost all ecosystems play a role in storing carbon, from grasslands and soils to rivers and oceans. Fauna & Flora’s efforts to protect threatened species and ecosystems therefore have the added benefit of preserving these carbon stores, and ensuring that they function healthily and perform this important service.
  • Reducing business impacts – Fauna & Flora is working with committed partners in the agricultural and extractive sectors to reduce their impact on biodiversity and ecosystem services such as carbon storage. Learn more.

Alleviating the effects of climate change

 Despite some progress on the international front, there is no doubt that our changing climate is already affecting species, ecosystems and people. We therefore need to take urgent action to deal with the changes we are seeing (such as unreliable weather patterns and extreme events) and to increase human and ecosystem resilience in order to prepare for the changes yet to come.

Fauna & Flora is tackling this in two ways:

  • Climate change adaptation planning – recognising the very real threat that climate change poses for the species and ecosystems we work with, Fauna & Flora began a number of years ago to look at our project sites to identify how biodiversity in these areas might be affected and develop strategies for dealing with these vulnerabilities. As well as looking at the direct impacts of climate change on biodiversity, we have been pioneering an approach that identifies how people living in or near our sites are being affected by climate change and helping them to adapt to these impacts (such as falling crop yields) without destroying their local ecosystems. Learn more.
  • Protecting threatened species and habitats – climate change has the potential to rapidly push a great many endangered species over the brink into extinction. All of Fauna & Flora’s work is focused in some way on protecting threatened ecosystems and safeguarding endangered species. In so doing, we are not only addressing the problems they face today, but also increasing the resilience of these species and ecosystems, giving them the best chance of survival as the effects of climate change take hold. Learn more.

Our work that addresses climate change

Thirty islands restored in 30 years
Sunset over the cliffs of Redonda. © Edward Marshall / Fauna & Flora
News

Thirty islands restored in 30 years

Fauna & Flora and partners have now restored 30 Caribbean islands, saving over a dozen species from extinction in the pr...
Coral symphony – A new record for Cambodia
Frame from video footage showing coral reef synchronised spawning in Cambodia. © Sorn Srenh / Koh Sdach Commune
News

Coral symphony – A new record for Cambodia

Synchronised mass coral reef spawning has been observed for the first time in Cambodian waters by Fauna & Flora and our ...
Fauna & Flora’s priorities for COP28
Fauna & Flora project vehicle on the road at sunrise in Guinea. © Ruben Bañuelos Bons / Fauna & Flora
Publication

Fauna & Flora’s priorities for COP28

This report highlights the five key areas we would like to see progress in at COP28, and offers a way forward. Cut emiss...
Climate change
Wild tulips
Tulips. © Ormon Sultangaziev / Fauna & Flora
Species

Wild tulips

Find out about Fauna & Flora's work with the neglected and threatened wild relatives of one of the world's most familiar...
Leatherback turtle
Turtle. © Doug Perrine / Nature Picture Library
Species

Leatherback turtle

Take a deep dive into the world of the planet's largest turtle and learn how we're tackling the threats to its survival....
Securing tulips and montane grassland in Kyrgyzstan
Tulips in Central Asia © Brett Wilson
Project

Securing tulips and montane grassland in Kyrgyzstan

Fauna & Flora and local partners are working to restore 500 hectares of degraded pastureland to protect Kyrgyzstan's wil...
Village forest conservation in Kerinci Seblat buffer zone
© Edy Susanto / Fauna & Flora
Project

Village forest conservation in Kerinci Seblat buffer zone

Fauna & Flora is working with local communities and the government to safeguard rural livelihoods and forest habitats in...
Northern Aceh forest conservation
© Juan Pablo Moreiras / Fauna & Flora
Project

Northern Aceh forest conservation

Fauna & Flora is collaborating with communities, local government, conservation agencies and rangers to protect threaten...
Piloting REDD+ in the Wonegizi Landscape
Forest in Wongezi / Wologizi. © Philip Tem Dia / Fauna & Flora
Project

Piloting REDD+ in the Wonegizi Landscape

Fauna & Flora is working with government and communities in Liberia to ensure the long-term protection and sustainable m...
Conserving ‘ridge to reef’ in Papua, Indonesia
© Fibrian Yusefa Ardi / Fauna & Flora
Project

Conserving ‘ridge to reef’ in Papua, Indonesia

Fauna & Flora is conserving Papua’s terrestrial and marine ecosystems with support from communities, the local governmen...
Catalysing action for Indonesia’s threatened trees
© Yanuar Ishaq Dc / Fauna & Flora
Project

Catalysing action for Indonesia’s threatened trees

Fauna & Flora and local partners are supporting the Ministry of Environment and Forestry to develop and implement a nati...
Hawksbill turtle
Hawksbill turtle. © Ollie / Adobe Stock
Species

Hawksbill turtle

Learn more about why hawksbills are so endangered and what action we are taking around the world to protect nests, hatch...
Yellow-naped amazon
Yellow-naped parrot. © Ondrej Prosicky / Adobe Stock
Species

Yellow-naped amazon

Follow the fate of the critically endangered Central American parrot that Fauna & Flora and partners are helping to prot...