Projects

  • Strengthening national capacity to address illegal wildlife trade in Liberia

    Liberia is a key source and transit country for illegal wildlife trade (IWT) in West Africa. In the country’s capital city, Monrovia, markets are well-known trade hubs, and porous international borders allow for easy, unregulated transboundary trafficking. Wildlife such as chimpanzees and Timneh parrots are wild-caught for the pet and entertainment trade, forest elephants are hunted for their ivory, most of which is for export, and pangolins and others animals are targeted for national, regional and international demand for wild meat and other wildlife products. Many species face serious decline across their range in the Mano River Union (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Côte d’Ivoire) and West Africa.

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  • Securing wild tulips and montane grasslands in Kyrgyzstan

    Kyrgyzstan is home to at least 27 wild tulip species, more than a third of the global total. At the height of spring, these beautiful species carpet mountain slopes in a brilliant show of yellow, orange and red. Such sites are, however, becoming increasingly rare. Tulips are in decline across the country, with most species struggling to cope with high levels of grazing pressure on these same mountain slopes. The loss of these species is an indicator of the declining health of these pastures. Intensive grazing also degrades soil, adversely affects other native plants and invertebrates, and reduces the quality of forage needed to sustain healthy livestock (which form a major part of local livelihoods and culture).

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  • Conserving the Tonkin snub-nosed monkey in Vietnam

    The critically endangered Tonkin snub-nosed monkey has been at the centre of FFI’s primate conservation activities for well over a decade. In 2002 and 2007, FFI surveys led to the discovery of two key populations of the species in Khau Ca forest, Ha Giang Province and later in Tung Vai watershed protection forest in Quan Ba district, Ha Giang province on the border with China. Since 2002, FFI has been focusing on community-led conservation by engaging local communities in species monitoring and habitat protection.

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  • Protecting Cambodia’s coastal and marine environments

    FFI has been working on marine conservation in Cambodia since 2010, with a programme of work that has evolved from an initial government request to help establish the country’s first marine protected area, known in Cambodia as a Marine Fisheries Management Area (MFMA). This site was formally designated in June 2016 and takes a multiple-use approach that supports sustainable fishing, biodiversity conservation and tourism.

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    • Illegal wildlife trade
    • Landscape & habitats
    • People & the environment
    • Forests
    • Africa
    Conserving Chuilexi Conservancy within Niassa National Reserve

    Northern Mozambique’s Niassa Reserve (4.2 million hectare) is one of the planet’s last remaining havens for biodiversity. Niassa harbours 40% of Mozambique’s entire elephant population, and is one of the most important refuges on the entire continent for two of Africa’s threatened carnivores, lion and wild dog.

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    • Climate change
    • Landscape & habitats
    • People & the environment
    • Forests
    • Eurasia
    Conserving threatened fruit-and-nut forests in Tajikistan

    This project is focused on the Childukhtaron and Dashitijum Nature Reserves in Tajikistan. Only 3% of the country is forested so both reserves are identified in Tajikistan’s National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan as two of the country’s three most valuable walnut-maple forest sites, with a rich variety of wild fruit and nut trees, including critically endangered pears, Pyrus tadshikistanica and Pyrus korshinskyi, as well as the vulnerable almond Amygdalus bucharica and apple Malus sieversii.

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  • Conserving migrating raptors in western Georgia

    The illegal trapping and sale of birds for falconry, a traditional practice in Georgia, pose a threat to raptor species. It is estimated that 200,000 birds are trapped each year with 5,000 being smuggled out of the country. For some species, birds regarded as low quality are also killed to remove them from populations.

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  • Sustainable Lansan Project

    This innovative project was requested by the Saint Lucia Forestry Department to ensure the long-term conservation of the endangered lansan tree while at the same time sustaining the economic and cultural benefits from the tree’s resin. The lansan tree is a distant relative of the frankincense trees in the Middle East, and its highly aromatic resin is traditionally used as incense for religious ceremonies and to ward off mosquitoes and – it is believed – evil spirits.

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  • Village forest conservation in Kerinci Seblat buffer zone

    Since April 2010 FFI has supported the establishment of well over 40 legally recognised Village and Customary Forests in Kerinci Seblat buffer area, as part of an integrated programme framed around low-carbon development. This model – whereby forest-edge communities are incentivised to protect and sustainably manage high-conservation value forests with the support of local government – has successfully safeguarded over 70,000 hectares of forest, which represents important additional habitat for Sumatran tigers beyond the national park boundary.

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  • Supporting Northern Rangelands Trust to deliver community-based conservation

    The Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT) is a community-led initiative, supported by FFI since its inception. NRT, with the support of FFI and other institutional partners, such as Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, the Kenya Wildlife Service and The Nature Conservancy, is working to develop capacity and self-sufficiency of community conservancies in biodiversity conservation and natural resource management.

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