Projects

  • Conserving Myanmar’s karst biodiversity

    The biodiversity of karst areas is poorly known and yet these systems are typically home to large numbers of severely range-restricted species. The major threats to karst ecosystems in Myanmar are poorly planned quarrying for cement, insensitive tourism, wildfires and hunting. Without attention to karst ecosystems and the species they harbour, extinctions are inevitable. Since economic sanctions have been lifted and Myanmar issued a new foreign investment law, construction is booming and so is the cement market.

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  • Protecting South Sulawesi karst landscapes

    Bantimurung-Bulusaraung National Park in South Sulawesi is characterised by steep, forest-clad hills and deep caves and contains the second largest karst (naturally eroded limestone) landscape in the world (after South China). Maros-Pangkep karst landscape covers about 40,000 hectares and features a distinctive type of karst formation known as tower karst.

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  • Conserving the Cat Ba langur in Cat Ba National Park

    Situated on Cat Ba Archipelago, off the coast of northern Vietnam, Ca Ba National Park holds the only remaining population of Cat Ba langur, which is critically endangered and teetering on the edge of extinction. In the 1960s the total population was believed to have been between 2,400 – 2,700 individuals, whereas today it is estimated to comprise a maximum of 50 – 60 individuals. The langur’s perilous situation is due to the negative impacts of human activities, including hunting and unsustainable tourism and infrastructure development.

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  • Conserving Delacour’s langur in Vietnam

    Found only in Vietnam, and with a global population numbering around 200 individuals, Delacour’s langur is on the brink of extinction. Van Long Nature Reserve – with an estimated 120 individuals – harbours the largest known population of this critically endangered species.

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  • Protecting rare conifers and magnolias in northern Vietnam

    The karst limestone hills of northern Vietnam are home to some of the world’s rarest and most remarkable trees, including several beautiful magnolias. Sadly, the area is under intense pressure from agriculture and local knowledge or skills surrounding tree conservation are limited. Through the Global Trees Campaign, FFI’s local partner, the Centre for Plant Conservation, is working with local community groups to protect and replant rare tree species in three sites.

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  • Barbados leaf-toed gecko project

    Barbados has tragically lost most of its endemic species due to habitat loss and the introduction of invasive alien species such as mongooses and monkeys. The Barbados leaf-toed gecko was among those believed extinct until a tiny population was rediscovered in 2011. The University of the West Indies, which has a large campus on Barbados, requested FFI’s help to assess the species’ status and needs, and to advise on its conservation.

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  • Lesser Antillean iguana project

    The endangered Lesser Antillean iguana used to inhabit many islands in the Eastern Caribbean but has been toppled from one country after another by overhunting and invasive alien species. The greatest threat today comes from common green iguanas, which first arrived as exotic pets and are now spreading rapidly across the region, transported by people and hurricanes. Bigger and faster breeding, the common green iguana takes over the habitats of native iguanas and interbreeds to form fertile hybrids.

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  • Islands of Anguilla

    Anguilla, a UK Overseas Territory, is in fact an archipelago of small karst islands, some of which harbour animals and plants that occur nowhere else. As the main island of Anguilla has become increasingly affected by development and the spread of harmful feral and invasive alien species, the offshore islands have assumed growing importance as wildlife sanctuaries and tourist attractions.

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  • Offshore Islands Conservation Programme

    Originally named the Antiguan Racer Conservation Project, this award-winning programme was launched in 1995 to save what was then arguably the world’s rarest snake from certain extinction. FFI and its partners have increased the critically endangered Antiguan racer population from only 50 individuals to over 1,100 by removing alien invasive rats and mongooses from more than a dozen islands around Antigua, and through a reintroduction programme and nationwide education campaign.

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