Projects

  • Strengthening national capacity to address illegal wildlife trade in Liberia

    Liberia is a key source and transit country for illegal wildlife trade (IWT) in West Africa. In the country’s capital city, Monrovia, markets are well-known trade hubs, and porous international borders allow for easy, unregulated transboundary trafficking. Wildlife such as chimpanzees and Timneh parrots are wild-caught for the pet and entertainment trade, forest elephants are hunted for their ivory, most of which is for export, and pangolins and others animals are targeted for national, regional and international demand for wild meat and other wildlife products. Many species face serious decline across their range in the Mano River Union (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Côte d’Ivoire) and West Africa.

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    • Illegal wildlife trade
    • Landscape & habitats
    • People & the environment
    • Forests
    • Africa
    Conserving Chuilexi Conservancy within Niassa National Reserve

    Northern Mozambique’s Niassa Reserve (4.2 million hectare) is one of the planet’s last remaining havens for biodiversity. Niassa harbours 40% of Mozambique’s entire elephant population, and is one of the most important refuges on the entire continent for two of Africa’s threatened carnivores, lion and wild dog.

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  • Supporting Northern Rangelands Trust to deliver community-based conservation

    The Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT) is a community-led initiative, supported by FFI since its inception. NRT, with the support of FFI and other institutional partners, such as Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, the Kenya Wildlife Service and The Nature Conservancy, is working to develop capacity and self-sufficiency of community conservancies in biodiversity conservation and natural resource management.

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  • Great ape conservation through local community forest management

    Within the vast mountainous landscape in the eastern Congo Basin are the largely rain-forested Kahuzi-Biega and Maiko National Parks covering 1,660,000 hectares. These parks, and the one million hectares forest area in between, are home to the world’s remaining population of critically endangered eastern lowland gorillas also known as Grauer’s gorilla.

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  • Supporting the Overberg Renosterveld Conservation Trust, South Africa

    The lowland renosterveld is part of the Fynbos Biome, although it is very distinct from Fynbos due to its lack of the three distinct Fynbos elements, the Proteas, Ericas (heather) and Restios (reeds). However, it is one of the richest ecosystems in the world, as a result of its extraordinary biodiversity. The renosterveld that we see today is vastly different from that of 300 years ago, before the large-scale agriculture began to threaten its existence.

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  • Conserving South Africa’s Cape Floral Kingdom

    South Africa’s landscape is one of the most diverse in the world. Its Cape Floral is one of only six flora kingdoms in the world. The ecosystem supports an impressive 9,600 recorded plant species, of which 70% are endemic. Many of the critical habitats of the Cape Flora (including the lowland fynbos, succulent Karoo and renosterveld) are being severely threatened by human development pressures on the land.

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    • Landscape & habitats
    • People & the environment
    • Marine
    • Africa
    Implementing effective marine resource co-management in the Pemba Channel Conservation Area

    Of the two islands making up the Zanzibar archipelago, the less populated and developed Pemba Island hosts some of the richest marine biodiversity in Tanzania and the East African coast in its extensive reefs and mangroves, including turtles, dolphins, dugongs and occasional whales. It is also one of the main sources of subsistence and income for its relatively remote communities, who have witnessed reduced fish catches due to overexploitation and damaging fishing practices – such as the use of destructive drag-nets.

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  • Supporting Ol Pejeta Conservancy to deliver sustainable conservation for wildlife and people

    Across Laikipia County, Kenyan conservation organisations have successfully managed the transition from colonial-era cattle ranches to mixed-use cattle/game systems that have encouraged burgeoning wildlife populations outside formal protected areas. Preeminent amongst these is Ol Pejeta Conservancy (OPC), which holds a Key 1 population of black rhinoceros, and species that are in general decline including African lion and wild dog.

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    • Biodiversity & business
    • Landscape & habitats
    • People & the environment
    • Forests
    • Africa
    Supporting effective management of Ziama Man and Biosphere Reserve

    FFI’s work in Guinea focuses on the Ziama Massif forest and is part of the transboundary project with Liberia. Ziama – a UNESCO Man and Biosphere Reserve (MAB) – contains the last remaining population of forest elephants in Guinea and is therefore considered a priority site for forest elephant in West Africa. The aim of the project is to ensure that Ziama is an intact and effective Man and Biosphere reserve supporting viable populations of key species, co-managed and equitably benefiting local men and women.

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