Projects

  • Sustainable Lansan Project

    This innovative project was requested by the Saint Lucia Forestry Department to ensure the long-term conservation of the endangered lansan tree while at the same time sustaining the economic and cultural benefits from the tree’s resin. The lansan tree is a distant relative of the frankincense trees in the Middle East, and its highly aromatic resin is traditionally used as incense for religious ceremonies and to ward off mosquitoes and – it is believed – evil spirits.

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  • Supporting conservation in the Maya Golden Landscape

    Ya’axché Conservation Trust, established in 1998, is an organisation with substantial technical capacity, and a growing impact and reputation in Belize. As a founder and long-standing partner, FFI has helped empower Ya’axché to become an extremely effective and highly regarded conservation organisation. Our partnership has enabled the ongoing protection of a critically important biodiversity corridor, the Maya Golden Landscape, which links the Maya Mountains and the Caribbean Sea.

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  • Eliminating destructive fishing practices and protecting marine habitat in Nicaragua

    With essential support from Oceans 5, FFI and our key partners are working to eliminate destructive fishing practices and protect marine habitat in an 80-km-long marine corridor along the Nicaragua Pacific coast. The work is ultimately designed to reduce the negative impacts of fishing on marine turtles.

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  • Establishment, protection and consolidation of the Awacachi Corridor

    The most significant tract of Chocó rainforest in Ecuador, the Awacachi Corridor was in grave danger of being converted to pasture and oil palm plantations. This would have destroyed vital habitat for species including endangered great green macaws, majestic jaguars and many other threatened species, as well as jeopardising a crucial wildlife corridor.

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  • Improving sustainable use of natural resources in Ometepe

    The remarkable island of Ometepe in Lake Nicaragua consists of two volcanoes – one dormant and forested, the other active – joined together by a low strip of land. The island is internationally recognised as an important area for birds, including those migrating south from North America.

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  • Conserving marine turtles in the eastern Pacific of Nicaragua

    Nicaragua hosts globally important populations of five marine turtle species, all of which are vulnerable, endangered or critically endangered according to the IUCN Red List, and hosts two of just nine mass nesting arribada beaches worldwide. However, illegal harvesting of eggs and killing of hawksbills for their shells has presented a serious threat to nesting leatherback, hawksbill and olive ridley turtles on Nicaragua’s Pacific coast.

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  • Central America marine project

    Focusing on marine protected areas in Costa Rica, Honduras and Nicaragua, this project is addressing themes common to all three countries such as marine governance, promoting community involvement in all decisions related to natural resource management, improving spatial management and access rights, and ensuring that lessons are shared regionally.

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  • Protecting rosewood from illegal logging in Belize

    The world’s most trafficked wildlife product is rosewood, a tropical timber tree from the Dalbergia genus that generates more revenue than elephant ivory, rhino horn and tiger parts combined. Through the Global Trees Campaign , FFI is supporting its partner in Belize, Ya’axché Conservation Trust, to protect high priority populations of one rosewood species, D. stevensonii.

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  • Pitons Christmas tree project

    With a little help from Christmas tree consumers in Saint Lucia, this project aims to save a rare native juniper from extinction. The critically endangered pencil cedar was once widespread in Saint Lucia and Barbados, but today the last colony survives only on the rocky peak of Petit Piton mountain in south-west Saint Lucia. Only a few mature individuals remain here.

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  • Restoring rare and threatened trees to Brazil’s Araucaria forest

    This project is working to restore a range of highly threatened tree species back into Brazil’s Araucaria forest. Following large-scale conversion of forests to farmland, less than 1% of the original primary forest remains, and at least 70 species of tree are now highly threatened. Although many tree planting initiatives are under way, ironically the rare and threatened species – those in greatest need of restoration – are seldom grown and planted (partly because these species are the most difficult ones to find and grow from seed).

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