Asian waterbird census highlights case for Ramsar site in Myanmar

Darters and cormorants Indawgi Myanmar. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI
Darters and cormorants Indawgi Myanmar. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI

Heavy fog across Indawgi Lake in northern Myanmar didn’t stop a Fauna & Flora International field team from counting more than 16,000 wintering birds recently as part of the Asian Waterbird Census.

Indawgi hosts a huge range of passage migrants as well as it own indigenous birds – from many species of duck, to storks and three types of vulture. During the survey over 160 species of birds were recorded, including Sarus crane and bar-headed goose and training of local rangers and students on bird census techniques was undertaken.

The survey results will also be used to highlight the international importance of Indawgi for migrating birds, and help highlight the case for giving the site Ramsar status.

Brown headed gulls at Indawgi Lake. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI
Brown headed gulls at Indawgi Lake. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI
Little and great cormorant, Indawgi Lake. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI
Little and great cormorant, Indawgi Lake. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI

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