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Siamese crocodile. © Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora

Siamese crocodile. © Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora

Please help save Siamese crocodiles

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You could help save Siamese crocodiles

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Fewer than 400 remaining – we must take urgent action

They are one of the oldest species on Earth. But their time is almost up. 

In an evolutionary blink of an eye, Siamese crocodiles have been wiped out from 99% of their former range, systematically captured and mercilessly exploited for their skins. 

Today, there are fewer than 400 mature Siamese crocodiles in the wild, almost all of which are found in Cambodia.

They are one of the last living connections to our planet’s long-lost past, but with the support of people like you, we can ensure their survival for generations to come. So please, help us save Siamese crocodiles. 

Why are crocodiles hunted? 

Siamese crocodiles – along with many other crocodilian species – are being targeted to supply the international skin trade. A shocking 1.5 million skins are harvested from crocodilian species every year, and a devastating 70,000 live crocodilians are exported for farming purposes each year.  

For Siamese crocodiles, it was the explosion in commercial hunting and large-scale farming in the 1950s that drove the species to the brink of extinction. You are more likely to see one of their skins worn as a fashion accessory than you would ever be to see one in the wild.  

Young wild Siamese crocodile head.

Young wild Siamese crocodile head.

You would be very unlikely to see a Siamese crocodile in the wild due to their rarity.

How many Siamese crocodiles are left? 

Siamese crocodiles were widely feared to be extinct in the wild until their rediscovery by a team led by Fauna & Flora in 2000. Today, there are fewer than 400 mature individuals left in the wild. 

If we don’t act now, the story of these ancient, resilient predators could end now – with us. 

What is Fauna & Flora doing to save Siamese crocodiles?  

Through a crucial captive-breeding programme, we are helping to release hundreds of Siamese crocodiles safely into the wild. In a positive move, the Cambodian government has moved swiftly to strengthen protection for the species, notably by gazetting a 400,000-hectare area of forest in the central Cardamoms.  

If we can obtain funding, this is a huge opportunity to double down and fully secure these creatures’ future. 

We are also working closely with local communities to safeguard wild Siamese crocodiles, something that is vital to this project. Some communities in the Cardamom Mountains consider these reptiles to be sacred and have protected them for generations.  

A portrait of Crocodile Warden Chhim Chhorn releasing a Siamese crocodile at Chhay Reap. © Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora

A portrait of Crocodile Warden Chhim Chhorn releasing a Siamese crocodile at Chhay Reap. © Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora

How could my donation save Siamese crocodiles? 

Your donation today could support our crucial captive-breeding programme in Cambodia, helping to release hundreds of Siamese crocodiles into the wild.  

That increase will depend on crocodile sanctuaries, which are protected by incredible local community wardens. Those wardens need salaries, boots, kayaks, uniforms and tracking tech to ensure they can keep these sanctuaries safe. 

In the short term, if we can get the equipment we need, we are looking to increase the size of the wild crocodile population in Cambodia by at least 150 individuals. The long-term goal of this project is to establish a viable wild population of at least 10,000 crocodiles across multiple securely protected areas in Cambodia. 

We simply must not let these extraordinary creatures die out. Fauna & Flora has already shown that there is hope for these rare reptiles.

With your support, we can change their fate for the better. 

Donate today

Siamese crocodile. Credit: Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora

Siamese crocodile. Credit: Jeremy Holden / Fauna & Flora