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Montage 2

Help us ‘Change the Face of Conservation’

Posted on: 30.05.12 (Last edited) 21 June 2012

Fauna & Flora International launches global campaign for World Environment Day 2012.

This campaign has now finished, but we’d like to say a big thanks to everyone who got involved.

With your help we were able to reach a huge audience (far larger than we could have managed on our own) and raise awareness of the plight of these threatened species, and countless others like them.

You’re welcome to keep using these pictures for as long as you’d like. Thank you so much for your support.

Fauna & Flora International (FFI) needs your help to Change the Face of Conservation.

Linking in with World Environment Day on 5 June 2012, this campaign will use the power of social media to help raise awareness of the threats to endangered species around the world.

The idea is simple: choose one of the beautiful images below and set this as the main picture on your social media profile accounts (such as Facebook, Twitter or Google+) or instant messaging services (such as Skype or MSN messenger).

Our aim is to get as many people as we can to change their profile photos over the next two weeks. Together we can get the message out to thousands of people and remind them what’s at stake.

Choose from one of the beautiful photographs below:

Sumatran Tiger

Sumatran tiger

Status: Critically Endangered

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Most recent surveys indicate that there are only around 500-700 Sumatran tigers left in the wild. The smallest of all the tigers, it has narrower stripes and a more bearded and maned appearance than other tiger subspecies.

Great green macawGreat green macaw

Status: Endangered

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The image of a tropical rainforest wouldn’t be complete without a gaggle of squawking parrots. The great green macaw is one of the larger and more colourful parrots in South and Central America, but sadly, as their habitat disappears, so do they.

Cao vit gibbonCao vit gibbon

Status: Critically Endangered

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The radiant cao vit gibbon is one of the rarest apes in the world. Severely threatened by habitat destruction, it is only known from one patch of forest on the China-Vietnam border, with a population of only around 110 individuals.

Hawksbill turtleHawksbill turtle

Status: Critically Endangered

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Prior to 2007 hawksbills were thought to be extinct in the eastern Pacific by most scientists. The major threat to this species is the collection of their eggs but they are also killed for their meat and stunning shells, which are used for jewellery.

Snow leopardSnow leopard

Status: Endangered

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The mysterious and beautiful snow leopard is found in the remote mountainous regions of Central Asia. Sadly, persecution and poaching have reduced the wild population to as few as 4,000 mature breeding individuals.

Siamese CrocodileSiamese crocodile

Status: Critically Endangered

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Over the past hundred years, habitat destruction and hunting have eradicated the Siamese crocodile from 99% of its historical range. Only around 250 adult Siamese crocodiles remain in the wild, chiefly in the remotest highlands of Cambodia.

Northern White RhinoNorthern white rhino

Status: Critically Endangered

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The northern white rhino has not been seen in the wild for many years, and is perilously close to extinction. In a dramatic bid to save this subspecies, the last four breeding individuals were relocated from a zoo to Kenya’s Ol Pejeta Conservancy.

Mountain gorillaMountain gorilla

Status: Critically Endangered

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Just over 780 mountain gorillas remain in the world today. Two isolated populations survive: in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable National Park and on the slopes of the Virunga volcanoes, straddling the borders of the DRC, Rwanda and Uganda.

Help us make a bigger impact:

  • Tweet using the hashtag #ChangeTheFace and ask your followers to get involved and mention @FaunaFloraInt on Twitter.
  • Add a #ChangeTheFace twibbon to your profile picture on Twitter or Facebook.
  • Post a message on your own page: I’m joining Fauna & Flora International to Change the Face of Conservation. I chose the… because…
  • Join the discussion – add a comment below or post on FFI’s Facebook page to tell us which species you chose, and why.
  • If you are using the new Facebook timeline, change your big cover photo to one of the habitat images below.

Facebook timeline cover photos

Below are habitat photos for each species – perfect for anyone who has recently moved to the new Facebook timeline.

Kerinci Seblat National ParkSumatran tiger
Kerinci Seblat National Park
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Awacachi Biological CorridorGreat green macaw
Awacachi Biological Corridor
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Cao Bang ProvinceCao vit gibbon
Cao Bang Province
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Estero Padre Ramos Natural ReserveHawksbill turtle
Estero Padre Ramos
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Zorkul Nature ReserveSnow leopard
Zorkul Nature Reserve
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Cardamom MountainsSiamese crocodile
Cardamom Mountains
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Ol Pejeta ConservancyNorthern white rhino
Ol Pejeta Conservancy
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Virunga National ParkMountain gorilla
Virunga National Park
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Written by
Sarah Rakowski

Sarah is Fauna & Flora International's Communications Officer (Media & Publications). With a BSc in Environment, Economics and Ecology, she has long been fascinated with the challenge of balancing human needs and environmental protection. Whilst at university, Sarah developed a keen interest in marine conservation and conducted an opinion survey into public attitudes towards Marine Protected Areas for her dissertation. Her love of marine conservation also led her to spend a summer conducting ecological surveys on the coral reef off the coast of Andros Island, Bahamas (it’s a tough job…). Since graduating, Sarah has held a variety of communications roles, most recently in the private sector, where she worked as the European PR Manager and Communications Specialist for a leading technology firm.

Other posts by Sarah Rakowski

Our aim is to get as many people as we can to change their profile picture for the next two weeks. Together we can get the message out to thousands of people and remind them what’s at stake.

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Fauna & Flora International (FFI) is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated in England and Wales, Registered Company Number 2677068. Registered Charity Number 1011102
Fauna & Flora International Australia (Ltd) is a company limited by guarantee, and recognised as a Charitable Institution (ABN 75 132 715 783, ACN 132715783)
Fauna & Flora International Inc. is a Not for Profit Organisation in the State of Massachusetts. It is tax exempt (EIN #04-2730954) and has 501(c) (3) status
Fauna & Flora International Singapore is a public company limited by guarantee, Registration Number 201133836K. Registered charity under the Singapore Charities Act