1. FFI Australia
  2. FFI US
  3. Conservation Circle

Working with government

Governments can have significant and lasting effects on the environment. Credit: Juan Pablo Moreiras/FFI.
Written by: Pippa Howard
Other posts by Pippa Howard

As decision-makers, land use planners, environmental stewards and educators, governments have significant and lasting impacts on the environment. They can also play a critical role in biodiversity conservation.

Declining natural resources pose a growing threat to economic sustainability, resource security and human well-being today and for the generations to come. Governments worldwide face the escalating challenge of balancing environmental stewardship with development goals, economic interests and political pressures.

Fauna & Flora International (FFI) works with all levels of government to support the protection and management of biodiversity in landscapes affected by extractive and agricultural sectors.

We work on the ground with local authorities to help them lead best practice environmental management, at a local and national level to guide policy development and strengthen governance and across political borders to co-manage critical shared resources.

Governments must increasingly balance economic, environmental and social needs. Credit: Juan Pablo Moreiras/FFI.

Governments must increasingly balance economic, environmental and social needs. Credit: Juan Pablo Moreiras/FFI.

Through capacity-building, technical support and best practice guidance, we help governments to balance development and conservation objectives by:

• Making the case for no net loss to biodiversity in areas important for conservation

• Understanding and managing the cumulative effects of development

• Applying integrated, sustainable landscape planning and management

• Developing and strengthening environmental legislation and governance

• Developing enabling legal and institutional frameworks

Below is a snapshot of our work with government.

Working with the Namibian government in the Central Namib Desert

Commissioned by the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism, FFI led a collaborative landscape level assessment of the Central Namib Desert to minimise the impacts of the country’s burgeoning uranium mining industry.

This approach used and analysed evidence and spatial data to transparently assess the relative importance of different areas and land uses within the region and their contribution towards conservation objectives.

Namibia's diverse landscapes are home to rich biodiversity. Credit: Pippa Howard/FFI.

Namibia's diverse landscapes are home to rich biodiversity. Credit: Pippa Howard/FFI.

Collectively, the outputs from this approach have acted as a decision support tool used to guide land-use planning and help decision makers understand the relative importance of biodiversity and ecological processes across the landscape.

Facilitating transboundary conservation in the Nimba Mountains

FFI is running a Darwin Initiative-supported project in the iron ore-rich and highly biodiverse Nimba Mountains of Guinea, Liberia and Côte d’Ivoire, where iron ore conflicts with biodiversity protection.

FFI is helping to develop a multi-stakeholder integrated conservation planning and management approach spanning Guinea, Liberia and Côte d’Ivoire. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI.

FFI is helping to develop a multi-stakeholder integrated conservation planning and management approach spanning Guinea, Liberia and Côte d’Ivoire. Credit: Jeremy Holden/FFI.

We are helping to develop a multi-stakeholder integrated conservation planning and management approach that enables mining companies, government officials, environmental groups and local communities to make collective decisions about the conservation and utilisation of natural resources in the area. It is hoped that this project will create a model for best practice in transboundary environmental governance.

Read blog posts on the challenges of creating a transboundary governance platform and bringing together government and other partners in the Nimba Mountains.

Improving watershed management in Lombok

Through the British American Tobacco (BAT) Biodiversity Partnership, FFI and local partners are developing a model for watershed conservation through sustainable landscape management practices in Lombok, Indonesia.

FFI is working in partnership with government, business and civil society in Lombok to develop a model for watershed conservation. Credit: Anna Lyons/FFI.

FFI is working in partnership with government, business and civil society in Lombok to develop a model for watershed conservation. Credit: Anna Lyons/FFI.

Working with multiple stakeholders across this landscape, including district, provincial and national government, the team is leading the government watershed management planning process for Renggung sub-catchment, ensuring recommendations are embedded in wider development plans for Lombok.

Working with the World Bank and the Colombian government

The Columbian Ministry of the Environment has mandated their proposal for compensation for loss of biodiversity. The protocol will ensure that delicate ecosystems and environmental areas are either left untouched by developers, or are properly replaced and compensated for.

FFI is working closely with the World Bank to assist the ministry with developing their policies and practices on biodiversity offsets and to implement this proposal.

Human pressure in Belize's islands (or "cayes"). Credit: Juan Pablo Moreiras/FFI.

Human pressure in Belize's islands (or "cayes"). Credit: Juan Pablo Moreiras/FFI.

Developing environmental legislation and policy in Belize

FFI is working to support the development of environmental impact assessment (EIA) legislation and policy as well as a new biodiversity offsets policy in Belize by building capacity and providing technical support related to mining, forestry and energy sector developments.

Written by
Pippa Howard

Pippa Howard is the Director of the Business & Biodiversity Programme. Pippa has degrees in Environmental Science, Marine Biology, Zoology and Development Management. She is a registered Professional Natural Scientist with over 20 years experience in a variety of spheres of biodiversity conservation, environmental management, impact assessment, development and sustainability. She has worked on projects in the UK, Ireland, South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Brazil, Ecuador, Alaska, Italy, Brazil, Indonesia, Liberia, Guinea, Chile, Spain, Bulgaria, Sultanate of Oman, Indonesia and Singapore. Pippa directs and is responsible for FFI's initiatives and partnerships with multinational corporations and all corporate affairs. She plays a key role in developing business and biodiversity strategy, business plans and financial management; provides specialist input to cross-sector partnerships and multidisciplinary programmes in biodiversity conservation; is a specialist in extractives sector environmental management, biodiversity risk assessment, action planning and management and biodiversity offsets design, management and implementation. Pippa also sits on a number of sectoral initiatives (BBOP, ICMM, GRI, IPIECA) and biodiversity advisory committees of extractive sector companies (De Beers, Rio Tinto, Nexen, Areva).

Other posts by Pippa Howard
Fauna & Flora International (FFI) is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated in England and Wales, Registered Company Number 2677068. Registered Charity Number 1011102
Fauna & Flora International Australia (Ltd) is a company limited by guarantee, and recognised as a Charitable Institution (ABN 75 132 715 783, ACN 132715783)
Fauna & Flora International Inc. is a Not for Profit Organisation in the State of Massachusetts. It is tax exempt (EIN #04-2730954) and has 501(c) (3) status
Fauna & Flora International Singapore is a public company limited by guarantee, Registration Number 201133836K. Registered charity under the Singapore Charities Act